5 Easy Tips That Will Help You Turn Pro

The first rule of being successful at anything, whether it’s photography, bull riding or playing the stocks, is to never stop honing your skill. Those that are the most successful in their craft continue to evolve their perspective and learn from their experiences. It has taken decades for the art of photography to become what it is with the foundation of principals that it has. Those that came before us and before you, as you are sitting here reading this blog, have created some basic knowledge and understandings that continue to remain true for the most professional of photographers. In this week’s blog, we have 5 quick and easy tips that are favorites of the pros but often missed by those just starting out. When put into everyday practice, these 5 little gems will help you get consistently excellent shots and turn you from an amateur to a pro.

Pro Tip #1: Lock in your focus.

Focus is focus. It’s where your eye is drawn first and then becomes the focal point of the entire image. If you are trying to get more than one subject to remain in focus in your shot, point at your first subject area and hold your shutter button half way down. This means your focus is now locked and you are free to move to the remaining portions of your image and finish pushing down the shutter release button. Your camera will not be able to readjust, which is what always ends up leaving your initial subject matter blurred and fuzzy.

Pro Tip #2: Move your point of focus.

I know I know, it is literally the exact opposite of what the first point says, but that doesn’t make it wrong and we’ll tell you why. When you look through your viewfinder, you see that rectangle or square or circle right? Well that is your camera’s “auto focus” point. Whatever happens to be in that sweet spot of your view finder will be the most focused portion of your picture. However, the sneaky truth about a camera’s auto focus is that you can move that AF point to correspond with the way you are composing your picture. Thus, both a brilliantly sharp and artfully composed image. What was that? Did I just hear someone whisper “pro”…?

Flickr dojoklo
Flickr dojoklo

Pro Tip #3: Get real close and use a high shutter speed.

One of the most underrated skills of photography is getting in close. Real close. Famous photographer, Robert Capa has been quoted saying, “If your pictures aren’t good enough, you aren’t close enough.” Don’t let your fear of getting in someone’s or something’s personal space stop you from getting the shot you truly want. They’ve already agreed to be photographed and therefore are already on display. What could it hurt to get in a bit closer? The important thing about getting in close though is that any teeny tiny movement will be detected and captured in your photos. Therefore, make sure to set your camera to a high shutter speed so when you push the shutter release, it can instantly capture the image with little or none of that camera shake. (Check out more tips on how to manage camera shake).

Pro Tip #4: Don’t edit it later, recompose in the moment!

Our blog post a couple weeks ago was all about the magic of Photoshop. We love it, we really do, but one thing we love more, is recomposing and getting your exact subject matter the first time. It may not take you very long to crop out that telephone pole or funky cloud arrangement but it will take you even less time to adjust yourself or the shot in your viewfinder in the moment. Photoshop should be reserved for enhancing the slight details of your shot, not completely recreating it. That job is up to you and the YOU is what makes your shots individual, desirable and emotional. The magic of you as an artist trumps the magic of Photoshop any day of the week!

Pro Tip #5: Be a harsh critique when editing.

You’ve heard it before but we’re gonna say it again…less is more. The best way to exhibit yourself as a pro is to only show your pro shots. Not the ones that have 2 out of the 4 elements you were going for. Not the ones that have 3 out of the 4 elements. Only pick the ones that are a straight homerun. 4 out of 4 elements, exactly what you were going for and don’t need any explanation. When you are looking at your shots, if there is one bit of hesitation, flag it as rejected. Your intuition is there for a reason. Listen to it, trust it, follow it. If the shot isn’t a “hell yes!” it’s a no. Take a look at these three pictures of these lovely little girls. Which one evokes the most emotion…?

Flickr noborders2
Flickr noborders2Flickr noborders2Flickr noborders2Flickr noborders2
Flickr noborders2

Yep, this last one above is the one. Happy editing!

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